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Unit 3: Tort and Dispute Resolution

CHAPTER 11: RESOLVING CIVIL DISPUTES

E-ACTIVITY: VIOLENCE IN SPORTS (p. 313)

Activity: Debate the Issue of Hockey Violence

Slashing. High-sticking. Body-checking. In recent years the issue of violence in sports has centred on the sport of hockey, especially in the professional leagues. What should or should not be allowed in this contact sport? Should there be limits to body contact or physical application of force?

In this activity, you will participate in a class debate about hockey violence. Specifically, you will argue for or against the following resolution:

Be it resolved that violence be banned from hockey.

The catch is that as you conduct your research you will not know which side of the debate you will be arguing. Therefore, you will have to find arguments to support both sides of the issue.
  1. Visit the following Web sites to find supporting arguments for both sides of the hockey violence issue.

    • The Marty McSorley case, as covered at the CBC News Web site
    • A summary of the McSorley case at the Web site of criminal lawyer Ron Jourard
    • Commentary from Ron Watson, an expert on hockey violence, at the Web site of the University of Western Ontario
    • The position of the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport at the CCES Web site
  2. Copy the following argument sheet into your notebook, and use it to list the arguments you identified in Question 1 both for and against the statement, "Be it resolved that violence be banned from hockey."
   
ARGUMENT SHEET FOR THE HOCKEY VIOLENCE DEBATE
Be it resolved that violence be banned from hockey.
PROS
CONS
   
   

 

  1. Your teacher will assign which side of the debate you will argue. The side you will argue may not be one with which you personally agree. In that case you must set aside your personal convictions for the duration of the exercise. After receiving your assignment, plan your strategy and prepare for the debate. Your debate should include the following:

    • a formal introduction
    • facts and arguments that support your assigned view
    • anticipation of the points against your view
    • counterarguments to defend your viewpoint
    • a statement that summarizes your position

 

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